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hillary clinton and u.s. strategy in afghanistan. a little later at 9:00 a.m. eastern you will hear from the head of the new consumer protection bureau on new credit card rules. industry executives, academics and consumer advocates will join her for this live coverage on c-span2. then more live coverage with a look at retirement and the future of social security at the woodrow wilson international center in d.c.. .. >> welcome. i am jack wadsworth, a trustee and vice chair of the asia society. i'm standing in for chip kay, our chairman, who is out of the country today but sends his very best. he's sorry he can't be here. i spent over 15 years building morgan stanley's business in asia, and i have to say reflecting bang on that -- back on that experience, the asia society was one of the great sources of knowledge to me for understanding the culture of the region. first, let me welcome everyone on behalf of the board of trustees and the staff to this very special program with the honorable hillary rodham clinton, secretary of state, to celebrate the legacy of ambassador richard holbrooke.
fence minister of afghanistan, abdul rahim wardak. >> our allies have come to help us defend the country or secure the country. it is true that blood is shed. we were proud throughout the history that we defended that country against overwhelming odds against every super power, against every conquering and now this is the first time. so we really want to be helped to restore our pride and arne to be able to defend that country like we defended it for 5,000 years. >> charlie: an afghan perspective on the afghanistan war when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: the best organic baby food. in a business like ours, personal connections are so important. we use our american express open gold card to further those connections. last year we took dozens of trips using membership rewards points to meet with the farmers that grow our sweet potatoes and merchants that sell our product. we've gone from being in 5 stores to 7,500. booming is using points to make connections that grow your business. effective. it is politically complex and it will save lives for our f
that country like we defended it for 5,000 years. >> charlie: an afghan perspective on the afghanistan war when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: the best organic baby food. in a business like ours, personal connections are so important. we use our american express open gold card to further those connections. last year we took dozens of trips using membership rewards points to meet with the farmers that grow our sweet potatoes and merchants that sell our product. we've gone from being in 5 stores to 7,500. booming is using points to make connections that grow your business. effective. it is politically complex and it will save lives for our friends and allies. >> charlie: is it doable. >> definitely. actually we have wasted a big window of opportunity from 2002 almost up to 2009 which we could have had national security forces to a level that today we would have been comfortable with. but the actual that you had mentioned it had been the longest war but i really disagree with this concept because up to 2007 and 8, afghan was an economy of first sector. t
have been distracted by the iraq war. >> yes, that's what i tried to say that afghanistan was in an economy of sector all those years. and the national security forces,70,000 -- 60,000 were really low based on analysis of troops to task any other historic example. >> charlie: if in fact the united states had not gone to iraq to topple sadaam hussein and had focused on afghanistan and had built up the state of afghanistan and had pursued al-qaeda in afghanistan, we would look at a very different situation today. >> i entirely agree with you. at the beginning when talibans were defeated with the help and support of the entire afghan nation in a very short time, it took them years, i mean, to regroup. so that all that time i think we could have spent more effectively to build afghan institutions and also very credible and strong national security force of the army and police both. >> charlie: you have said that that's your message to washington. >> yes. >> charlie: i think washington knows that. that's been the argument all awe long. the question is can they do it and can
are being spent on construction projects in afghanistan. after that, more on afghanistan. the u.s. institute of peace reports on the political strategy in that region. also remarks from secretary of state hillary clinton on taliban forces in afghanistan and pakistan. >> for young americans, to save medicare and sells security and make the systems work better and keep our promise to americans, we have to change. >> ohio republican jim in jordan on spending issues, the tea party, and president obama as proposed budget, sunday. >> this monday, visit the public and private space is america's most recognizable home, the white house the original documentary provides a look at the history of the presidential residence and take you through the, the west wing, all the laws, and lincoln bedroom and focuses on the presidents and first families who have most influence how it looks today, airing in high-definition and updated with interviews with president obama and the first lady and comments from georgia and laura bush" the white house, side america's most famous home." >> several companies that have c
] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ secretary of state hillary clinton today discussed u.s. efforts to get the taliban in afghanistan to sever ties with al qaeda. she describes the three part strategy aimed at bringing about political reconciliation in afghanistan. speaking at the asia society in new york secretary clinton also announced the appointment of retired ambassador mark rose and the special representative for afghanistan and pakistan. he replaces ambassador richard holbrooke who died last december. this is just under an hour. [applause] >> thank you. well, it is wonderful to be back here at the asia society, and i thank vishakha for that introduction, and for her strong leadership. also to thank jack wadsworth and all the board members and supporters who are here doing what life is very important work, continuing to build ties between people across regions and continents and looking for opportunities to find those points of common concern and common cause. it is always a pleasure to be back here. i tell vishakha that it's mostly because of the gift shop. [laughter] i'm always coming back. i gave my first major spee
in afghanistan and the political strategy for peace. we will hear from a former afghan government minister. live coverage from the u.s. institute of peace starts at 10:00 eastern. donald rumsfeld was the youngest and oldest person to serve as u.s. defense secretary. >> if you have proximity to a president you have an obligation to tell the truth and what you really believe. because people who don't have that can only see him occasionally, simply don't want to do it. >> he will discuss his philosophy of presidential staff leadership, process of writing his memoirs, known and unknown and address the critical and positive reviews. four of the candidates trying to replace richard daley of chicago for mayer meat for their final debate. chicago voters go to the polls next tuesday, february 22nd. if no candidate receives a majority of top two will be on the ballot for and april 5th runoff. w l s t. the post this debate from the oriental theater in chicago. >> welcome to tonight's debate for candidates from chicago being hosted at broadway in chicago's oriental theater. the candidates will debate the is
in the canadian house of parliament. also, comments from hillary clinton on afghanistan and pakistan. on "q&a", former defense secretary donald rumsfeld. tomorrow on "washington journal" several guests discussed obama's 2012 budget requests. there is a targeted program for spending cuts with coling, national fuel fund's executive director. pete outline hidden taxes that he believes are hidden in the budget. then, a discussion on how taxes are hidden in the budget with james thurber. >> i asked you to come here this evening so we could immediately hear a person and report from the secretary of state regarding the negotiations going on in europe. >> you can look at this as a historical curiosity. this is a forerunner of today's managed news. >> find out something you did not know about the 43 men that served as president. they are all free online. watch what you want when you want. up next, highlights from question period in the canadian house of commons. they question the prime minister on the questions of the day. cabinet ministers took questions on canada's border security and a task on th
level of american troops will need to be in a afghanistan in 2014. what do you tell him. >> it depends on how well we grow and what will be the next for the afghan national security forces. this is discussed right now in the congress. >> charlie: you just said it depends on how well we do our job, whether the americans can leave. >> the thing is we have committed, i think president karzai has articulated in his inaugural speech that in the next three years we will take the lead of all operation, in the next five years with one year has passed now i think we will be responsible for the physical security of the country. >> charlie: in what we are? >> in 2014. and it will be then. so based on that, i mean this year i think you will see the transition of the security sometime when summer will start on the 21st of march there will be an announcement by president karzai that these provinces or these cities and districts security responsible will be taken over by the afghans. and we are really vigorously working throughout afghan leadership and afghan ownership policy that we have agreed wi
in afghanistan. i would just like to start by saying, i find it harder and harder to see how the current strategy could be made to work. we have a military surge. but the insurgency has been spreading from the south and east to provinces. they used not to be the ground for insurgency. this continued centurion pakistan, a tenfold increase of taliban fighters since 2005. what my staff estimated was about to a 3,000 fighters. the recent estimates have been up to 35,000. some analysts was suggesting a much higher number than 35,000. also a vast amount of money has been spent, and the pressure to spend that money quickly has resulted in a war that in itself, i think, is stealing some of the rivalry and conflict on the ground. the massive conflict is becoming much more messy, not just about taliban government, but all kinds of localized conflict that are unclear in the bigger picture. the whole industry that has grown up around our foreign aid, extortion, corruption that plagues the construction, private security contracts, and many reports that have been written about these things. is networks of powe
to seek a diplomatic process that is durable within afghanistan will be the most effective way to do much, much more with much less both in terms of blood and treasure than a policy that only emphasizes the escalation followed by hand over to a very shaky regime at this overtime will much better secure the long-term national security interest of the united states as well as the interests of the parties within afghanistan. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, and thank you to all the three speakers for very, very rich presentations, which both teachers quite a few lessons but also holds quite a few new questions. my policy is to offer some reflection before we start, and hopefully to those reflections will further stimulate the debate. i was reminded this morning about the engagement in afghanistan. the guest house where we were living tended to discuss issues, but we also had -- before written? in discussion with other guests at the guesthouse. and, of course, that also is telling not only because engagement but because that engagement is also one key resource in reducing the ideas. softly
of contract construction projects in afghanistan. there are literally thousands of these projects ranging from schools and clinics in afghan villages to power plants and training centers in afghan cities to dining facilities for u.s. and nato troops. they are all important and involve billions of taxpayer's dollars funneled through contractors through the department of defense and state or through the u.s. agency for international development. at our january 24th session, we heard from government folks, special inspector general for afghanistan reconstruction, aid, and witnesses from the army corp. of engineer, and the air force center for engineering and the environment. we were also supposed to hear from the witnesses who are back today, but we got so involved in the first two panels that there wasn't enough time left in the room reservation to do justice to our guests. we apologize for the attendance of our third panel which is here today, and we thank you gentlemen for agreeing to talk with us and take our questions, and we thank you for not complaining for having to come back
that wherein. there's a lot of objectivity. i mean, in particular obviously in afghanistan not only continuity but essentially obama administration has doubled down. since we last talked about afghanistan, i think there's been a huge very underreported shift which is december 2014. the republican present said they were before more years in afghanistan with substantial number of troops. they will be there after that. >> host: if president mccain would be saying it senator obama would be leaving the opposite. i think being in a commander-in-chief seat is a different perspective that he didn't have as senator, and that lawmakers just don't have. >> guest: maybe, but also early on obama was, you know, he was always characterizing the afghan war sort of the good work and the iraq war at the wrong war. but the fact, there's no debating the fact that the liberal side of the democratic party would be very of those if this was a republican president. because it doesn't fit with the narrative. it's not just the democratic party. it's the president himself seems to miss this. it's a huge story. it's a mu
got this arrangement with the ministries and officials in afghanistan. before i introduce the panel, let me welcome afghanian'snew ambassador to the united states. we are very pleased to have you he. ambassador, we hope he will be here regularly or at our new facility. thank you peery much for being here. and ambassador tony wayne is also here. welcome. very good to have you. we also have added mnister at the national defense university. we are very pleased this morning to have two very distinguished ministers, very senior ministers, very experienced ministers from afghanistan. mr. wardak of defense has had experience which he can describe and i'm sure you have questions for him back to the time when he was fighting the soviets. he remembers many of the battles, many of the locations that took place then and those that terrain and that battle. we were talking last night. he's also spend some time in the united states doing some infantry training. he has been an airborne ranger having been trained at fort benning. so we are very pleased that mr. wardak is here. he's joined by the min
to implement many of the same tactics, which they use in afghanistan and we thought was youth in iraq implementing in an embrace suicide bombings, ieds, things were associating with iraq coming to afghanistan. these days iraq is a forgotten country. and the media, nobody cares about it. it's hard to be get people interested. afghanistan is a little more than this because there's more americans they are. but americans are dying from the country tends to be a little more interested. we can't understand what's happening in afghanistan without understanding what happened in iraq and what they think happened in iraq. so i'd like to start with a discussion about iraq and the implications for afghanistan. the narrative, which is impossible to challenge that iraq was going forward play because of poor planning and in 2006 you had this shine i mean come out right in iraq shia shrine north of baghdad can all hope for clues in the civil war started in iraq was falling apart until the physically fit phd general called david petraeus arrived in safety dave, the new american hero and now he will sa
is in afghanistan about the unfolding situation in egypt, i would ask the prime minister to a big house and the security of british nationals. can he inform us of the arrangements being made for those who want to return to the u.k.? >> first of all, can thank the gentleman for his tribute to our troops and for his visit to the afghanistan and a think it is important that we go ahead, in this difficult endeavor, on all across-party basis. the first concern should be for our own u.k. nationals and for the situation that they are in. there are 30,000 u.k. nationals in the red sea area, which at the moment remains calm and stable. we have not changed travel advisories to that part of the area. in terms of making sure those who want to return can and we have urged me to do so, there are very good commercial flights and we have added a flight commissioned by the british government in the last 48 hours and a thousand u.k. citizens have returned. the military logistics team -- we were the first country to set up a team at the cairo airport. i do not take any of this for granted. there has been
got at the munich security conference this year. it was quite significant to me on afghanistan. the first i thought there was a real change in opinion from our european colleagues that we really army can progress in afghanistan, and they feel good about it. and normally we have been concerned that -- i have been that they would lead the fight before we get. they turned the tables on us this time. and they said, we are committed now through nato to the 2014 exit date from afghanistan. we are worried that you in america are going to begin to leave earlier and they still have in mind notwithstanding all the transition to 2014 this july of 2011 date, so i would ask you if you would care to respond to that and of course part of that is just to urge that whatever we do in 2011, july of 2011 be mindful of the effect it will have not only on the afghans in the region but on our european allies. >> i would just make two comments. first, i had a nato defense ministers meeting last december, and it was really quite extraordinary, because i don't think i have ever seen so many ministers so
provides approximate $100 billion for the department of defense operations in afghanistan. this amendment states that not more than $10 billion of the funds made available by the bill may be used for military operations in afghanistan. the intent is clear. it is time to bring u.s. involvement in the war in afghanistan to an end and to bring our troops home. the war effort in afghanistan is no longer serving its purpose of enhancing the security of the united states, which should be our goal. we were attacked on 9/11 by al qaeda. al qaeda had bases in afghanistan. it made sense to go in and destroy those bases, and we did. we had every right. we had every duty to destroy bases which are being used to plot attacks against the united states. but the c.i.a. tells us there are now fewer than 100 al qaeda personnel in all of the country of afghanistan. congress and the american people helped greatly reduce u.s. involvement in iraq through the election in 2006 and 2008, we forced a new direction in iraq and helped bring thousands of troops home. we must now do the same in afghanistan. the intent
of afghanistan is around 29 million, and there's probably no more than 80,000 u.s. soldiers serving in afghanistan right now, but if you look at the stories that come out, you think the numbers are completely reversed. all the stories are about americans, and you see almost no images of stories about the afghan people themselves, so if you look at the dominant representational paradigm uc today, it is all about foreign soldiers. my idea was to try incurred counted to that a popularized narrative and focus on images and stories that really reflect that lived experience of conflict through the eyes of the afghan people. >> you are exhibiting with three other photographers. it is true all three of them have really focused in the areas where a lot of u.s. and allied forces are seeing action, are actually involved in combat, so your story is different than theirs. what does it mean to show your body of work along side of the stories that probably are more familiar? what kind of juxtaposition does that create for you as an artist? >> i think the strength of bringing the two different stor
. it doesn't have a great deal of use. i'm interested in the area where the u.s. is raging war, afghanistan, iraq, pakistan, possibly iran. there's three balances of power in that reason. the israeli, iraqi and pakistani. the area's earlier relationships, borrowing -- barring a change in egypt overtime, israel is so dominant it can create new realities on the ground and is indifferent to what the united states says. in afghanistan, the united states is asking pakistan to do things that create instability, that weaken pakistan, that potentially create an independent regional power in india that the united states may not appreciate in the long run. , and iraq has destroyed the balance of power creating what is the most immediate issue that forgetting nuclear weapons, iran is the dominant military force in the region if the united states isn't there. the united states has its policy to withdrawal from iraq, the potential for iran feel filling the -- filling the vacuum is high and that changes the balance of power or at least the political dynamic in the arabian peninsula. there are visitly imp
with a penny the bay area? probably nothing. in montana you can buy 1/2 tootsie roll. but in afghanistan you can buy a pencil. it's not that's so important but education gives a child hope. you know, if you fight tear riz her rorism it's based in fear but the real enemy is ignorance that bleeds hatred. here in america, afghanistan, africa or pakistan. the way to overcome that i think is through education and also with having courage and compassion. instead of building walls we need to build peace and have the courage to do that. so i went back to pakistan in 94 and brought the school supplies and finally got to the village and the man was again there to greet me. he shook his head and said, chizle what the heck. not only had i come back, he said you've made two big mistakes. we don't start building before wintertime and if you really want to build school we're going to have to build a bridge first and i hadn't really thought about that. so i came back to america and raised 10,000 more dollars. and then i got back from tack stan and bridge got built and no school yet. i was 38 years old, die
for america. ms. . [applause] in afghanistan and iraq where our troops are committed, the obama administration has signaled over and over ha there is nothing -- that there is nothing they want so much as to get out of town. well, let me tell you how i see it. you don't send young americans to fight and possibly die in a far off land unless you are ready to let them win. [applause] the best way, the only way to protect freedom is to look ahead, be confident and, sure, speak softly but carry the biggest stick on the block. [applause] while we in the new house majority do all this, my assignment will be to focus on a clear and present danger rising in our own hemisphere. a danger that extends its strength and reach every day. a danger that this administration, like previous administrations, has not fully understood. i'm talking about hugo chavez and his campaign to destroy freedom and democracy throughout latin america. [applause] to be toolings or or to be toolings r or -- for too long former administrations and the current have thought of chavez as the clown king of caracas, a bouncing baffoon
're asked to do nothing. you know, i say this as a critic of the wars in iraq and afghanistan. i don't like them. i want them to end. but if you're going to do them, you ought to pay for them. and i think that's a better way to control our deficit and start paying down other debt. thank you. >> thank you. mr. woodall. >> thank you, mr. chairman. and i appreciate you gentlemen being here today and i appreciate the hard work you've been doing, mr. chairman, to take all the orders that you've been taking and try to do things as fair as you could. i did notice that as mr. mcgovern went through his list of things that he thought might have been cut too much there were only three things on his list that he didn't think got cut enough and he didn't think he could have gotten to this bill anyway. you didn't leave anything on the table and i'm grateful to you for that. that's the marching orders we got. >> we went into this with the idea that there should be shared sacrifice. we knew if we were to solve the problem of the deficit and the enormous dhaet we're incurring on our children and grandchildr
and friends. last weekend i saw myself the bravery and the commitment of our troops in afghanistan and all of those involved in our wider effort there. i think everyone who visits i came away with an overwhelming sense of admiration and humility and i pay tribute to everyone who's based in afghanistan. can i stop by asking the prime minister of the unfolding situation in egypt? can i ask him to update the important issue of the security of british nationals? can he inform us of the arrangements being made for his who want to return to the u.k.? >> can i thank the right honorable gentleman to his visit to the troops to the troops and i think it's very important that we go on this difficult endeavor and i braise him for what he said. in terms of egypt, of course, he's right. the first concern should be for our own u.k. nationals and for the situation that they're in. of course, there are around 30,000 u.k. nationals in the red sea area which at the moment remains calm and stable and we've not yet changed travel advice in terms of egypt. in terms of the rest of the egypt there are 3,000 citiz
in afghanistan today, there's 5 point 2 million children going to school and 1 point 8 million of those are female and in 2000 there was only 8 hundred 6,000 kids in school. how many of you know that fact? one, two, you? so that makes my total now - i've counted 21 people in america. to me that's single most incredible inspiring news to come out of that country. that alone is justification for the sacrifice and cost and the investment in that country and nobody in america is aware of that. the media, government, the people. to me that news should be broadcast from every mountain top in this publication called hope we write about that. go and tell people there's some really good things happening and it's related to employ kabs and the number of kids in afghanistan it's gone up six fold since 2000. unfortunately there's other forces at work. in the last year the taliban have bombed more than 400 mostly girls schools and it's travesty. what's amazing if you go back, they've been written off the government records and not getting funding but some kids are still trying go to school in these
billion for operations in afghanistan and iraq. but there's pressure from capitol hill to cut government spending and defense to rein the deficit. the house voted to end funding for a second engine nor the fighter eric watershed that indicates congress's willingness to cut defense spending. leaders are pressing for deeper cuts that defense secretary robert gates said would be devastating for military capabilities. here to talk about this budget, programs and industrial policy is ash carter, the undersecretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics. welcome back to the show. >> good to be back. >> let's started off with the emotional testimony we had last week where defense secretary gates made a plea to not look at the defense department for further cuts and made a plea to actually get a functioning budget. what is the -- what is so bad about having a continuing resolution especially one that goes beyond march 4th? >> the continuing resolution operating under that kind of framework means that every program manager, every single program manager in the department, all of my p
in connecticut about whether the wars in afghanistan and iraq in the last ten years have contributed in some way to undermining u.s. power in the world. >> the war in iraq, uh, was a tremendous display of our technology, and certainly with the "shock and awe" phase of that war, it was extremely impressive. i, i don't think that we have many rivals in terms of technology. afghanistan is a different war. uh, it's not so much on technology. certainly we use it, but not to the degree i think that, that we saw. i think afghanistan is gonna be more of a trial of our leadership and our combat experience, and it's a different type of war than what we fought, um, in iraq, i think. >> i would not say that our military power is declining just because we are struggling in iraq and afghanistan. i, i think we're still eminently the highest military power in the world, and the fact that we're not exercising that power as much, which emanates from the fact that we don't want to be spilling more blood abroad and to be using our manpower and our equipment, does not make it so that we are not a military power. we
is waging war which is iraq, afghanistan, to some extent pakistan, possibly iran. this is the battle of the united states. there are three balances of power in that region, the air and is really coming year on iraqi and indo-pakistani. each of them had destabilized of the ten years and the arab-israeli relationship barring some dramatic change in egypt over time israel is so dominant that it can create new realities on the ground and is in different to what the united states says very often. in afghanistan, the united states is asking pakistan to do something that create instability week in pakistan that potentially create the independent regional power in india that the united states cannot appreciate in the long run, and of course iraq has destroyed the iran iraq has the most immediate issue which is for getting the nuclear weapons iran is the dominant conventional military force if the united states is there. the united states has its policy, but the potential for iran is extremely high and that changes the balance of power or the political dynamic in the arabian peninsula. they a
, afghanistan, to some extent pakistan, possibly iran. the three balances of power in that region, the arab-israeli, iran-iraqi and the indo-pakistani. each one of them have been destabilized of the ten years. in the arab-israeli relationships, barring some dramatic change of egypt over time, israel is so dominant that it can create new realities on the ground and there is indifference to what the united states releases very often. in afghanistan, the united states is asking pakistan to do things to create stability that we can pakistan that should create independent regional power in india that the united states may not appreciate. and of the course the invasion of iraq to destroy the power creating what is the most immediate issue which is for getting nuclear weapons iran is the dominant conventional military force in the region if the united states is there the united states has in its policy the withdraw from iraq, iran filling the vacuum is extremely high. that in turn to the qtr changes the balance of power or the political dynamic in the arabian peninsula. they are vitally important
in the area where the united states is waging war, which is iraq, afghanistan, pakistan possibly iran. these are the battle spots for the united states. there are three balances of power in that region. the arab-israeli, the iraqi and the pakistani. each one of them have deed stabilize -- have destabilized over the last 10 years. israel is so dominant that it creates new realities on the ground. there's a difference to what the united states release is very often. in afghanistan, the united states is asking pakistan to do things that creates instability, that will weaken pakistan, that potentially creates an independent regional power in india that the united states may not appreciate in the long run. and, of course, the invasion of iraq has destroyed the iran-iraq balance apparently what is the most immediate issue which is forgetting nuclear weapons, iran is the dominant conventional military force in the region if the united states isn't there. the united states has its policy to withdraw from iraq, potential for iran to attack is extremely high. that in turn changes the balance of
pleased we have got this arrangement with the ministries and officials in afghanistan. before i introduce the panel, let me welcome afghanistan's new ambassador to the united states. we are very pleased to have you here. ambassador, we hope he will be here regularly or at our new facility. thank you peery much for being here. and ambassador tony wayne is also here. welcome. very good to have you. we also have added minister at the national defense university. we are very pleased this morning to have two very distinguished ministers, very senior ministers, very experienced ministers from afghanistan. mr. wardak of defense has had experience which he can describe and i'm sure you have questions for him back to the time when he was fighting the soviets. he remembers many of the battles, many of the locations that took place then and those that terrain and that battle. we were talking last night. he's also spend some time in the united states doing some infantry training. he has been an airborne ranger having been trained at fort benning. so we are very pleased that mr. wardak is here. he's j
that is about to change it, if iraq and afghanistan taught us anything. it is that we are forced to be doing these kinds of things in these countries -- we are fools to be doing these kinds of things in these countries, like we are doing them a favor. along with a change in the vector of the defense budget in those few years, we are going to see a re-thinking of just what we think we are doing out there and what we need to do, and one of those answers is going to be about the fate of the aircraft carriers. >> when does this book it? >> the electronic version is out right now. if you google it, you can get a download version. i am going to print the first 500 copies and take them to a booked event this week, so, yes, it is coming out -- take them to a book event. >> meanwhile, secretary rumsfeld's book is no. 1. he has been very successful. why do you think that? >> because he had a publisher behind him. yes, he is a big deal. the publisher has gone to great lengths to get him on tv and to all kinds of events. it has been, quote, a major book, end quote. i have not read all of the pages of it
up the capacity of afghan civil society to articulate what kind of afghanistan people want to live in. and building up the capacity to put pressure on the partes, put pressure on the government, the pressure on the taliban about women's rights, human rights, children's rights. and i think from my own testimony -- my past expense, the days in boston where we were pushing very hard for returns, and there was such a strong constituency among the bosnians who were insisting on those returns happening. we could come behind them and support them. so i think there must be a role for us to help galvanize both society and an articulate their position. and, finally, on pakistan and some of the regional questions. yes, i think more pressure would probably be needed. at the moment pakistan -- pakistan's situation is one that will probably not be very -- it will be hard to put the pressure on because i think that such a sense of fragility in pakistan itself. but i do think that pakistan is starting to see the stable afghanistan is, in fact, in its interest. and i think that there's some potential
geographic" about his article on afghanistan's opium war. "washington journal" is next. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] host: good morning, and welcome to "washington journal" on this monday, february 7, 2011. president obama will -- the chamber of commerce today for the first time as commander in chief. we will carry that live this morning on c-span at 11:30 a.m. our question to start "washington journal" -- should president obama court of the business community? the numbers to call -- let's take a look at a peace in "usa today" talking about the president's address at the chamber of commerce. obama faces business leaders. host: should the president of the business community? matt, caller from manhattan. what do you think the president should do here? caller: i think he ought to stand up to the business community once and for all. big business, corporations, don't pay taxes. corporations write their own regulations. the regulation is there should be no regulation. they are masters at obtaining what the
's the real terror that you're filled with over there. >> rose: let me turn quickly to afghanistan. petraeus has been there for a while now. there's much discussion of wareham ham is and what he intends to do and there's who's winning and who's not and the changes petraeus has brought. where is afghanistan in your judgment both in terms of the civil effort as well as the military strategy? >> i think afghanistan is in the worst situation that it's ever been in. for me it's shameful that no one is talking about the fact that there's a complete breakdown in diplomacy in afghanistan ever afghanistan. there is almost no relationship between hamid karzai and the u.s. ambassador carl eikenberry. that's filtered down to every effort and it drastically affects the u.s. relationship. to me the problem in afghanistan is not military. yes, i mean, on the battlefield we face all kinds of obstacles that are incredibly difficult. yes there's been progress in the south. there's no doubt from speaking to commanders and soldiers and afghans that we have progressing in the south but whether that means anythin
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